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Sat
15
May '10

Day 227: Tuesday, 11 May 2010

Posted by steve@buddyandme.co.za

Categories: Buddy and Me

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My updated itinerary for Namibia and Botswana, to the end of the tour.

The PROPOSAL TO THE PRESIDENT for your perusal.

To watch Buddy and Me in real time click here, select South Africa under “Global Fleet Logins:” in the left hand panel, enter cellphone number 0822549129 and password Buddy.

To make a donation to or information on any of the organisations involved in assisting victims of child rape and abuse, please click on one of the following links:

Beares
Lubners
Bobbi Bear Foundation (KwaZulu-Natal)
The Teddy Bear Clinic (Gauteng)
The TygerBear Foundation (Western Cape)
GRIP (Mpumalanga)
StepThru (Gauteng)

Last night I had a wonderful nights sleep and as usual my tent was open because the fly net front flap’s zip (damn that’s a tongue twister) broke about four months ago and so because I can’t sleep with the solid canvas flap closed, I kind of get claustrophobic with it closed, and also if it’s closed its completely dark and if the sun doesn’t wake me I will probably end up sleeping all day, my tent remained open. So I was up just before 5:30 (6:30 SA time) and sat outside my tent sipping on a cup of coffee watching the sun rise, pure magic, all I needed to round it off to be a perfect setting was a fishing rod in my hand.

Close by to my camp was a couple who were camping, well I don’t know if the word ‘camping’ suites what they are doing, because they are doing it in style with a lovely caravan and really smart 4X4, but I suppose when you have worked as hard as they have all your life you deserve to reap the benefits. They were Tom and Maggie Matthis who hail from Polokwane and who have been spending the last few years touring around Africa and experiencing the amazing beauties this incredible continent has to offer.

<i>Meet Tom and Maggie Matthis, hey guys you promised to keep in touch so I’m going to hold to it</i>

Meet Tom and Maggie Matthis, hey guys you promised to keep in touch so I’m going to hold to it

After stopping off at Gerrit de Vos’s iTech shop to send off my blog to Gail so she can up-date my website, I stopped off at the Beares store to bid farewell to Petru and her friendly staff until we meet again on the next project and before tackling the 180 kilometre drive to Tsumeb. Now 180 kilometres might sound a short distance to the average motorist, but to ‘Buddy and Me’ this involves a three and a quarter hour drive. Everyone in Tsumeb kept telling me that the drive to Tsumeb is only an hour and fifteen minutes, but they couldn’t understand that this is Buddy we talking about, and so the drive is much longer. ‘Buddy and Me’ average 60 kilometres an hour and so I must allow ONE HOUR for every 60 kilometres we travel, and today was no exception. We left Otjiewarongo at 10 past 10 in the morning and arrived in Tsumeb at half past 1 in the afternoon, and that was with three short stops of about 10 minutes each to cool down Buddy’s oil.

The drive was a really enjoyable one, although the countryside was pretty monotonous with kilometre after kilometre of flat dense bush for as far as I could see in all directions. Pretty much the same as the previous trip to Otjiewarongo from Okahandja, but being out in the bush and visiting the country towns is far better than being in the cities any day.

<i>This photo was taken from the top of a bridge, fortunately there was a railway- line which forced them to build a bridge and so <b>‘Buddy and Me’</b> had a slight incline and a bend in the road nogal, and from here you can see how far you can see into the distance, almost into next week</i>

This photo was taken from the top of a bridge, fortunately there was a railway- line which forced them to build a bridge and so ‘Buddy and Me’ had a slight incline and a bend in the road nogal, and from here you can see how far you can see into the distance, almost into next week

Along our route, actually 110 kilometres after leaving Otjiewarongo, ‘Buddy and Me’ passed through the “metropolitan City” of Otavi. Now this is definitely one of those places that if you blink when passing through you will definitely miss, but be that as it may they have a filling station and a Spar, so I filled up Buddy’s tank, again, and we continued on our merry way.

<i>Welcome to the “metropolitan City of Otavi”, what you see in the back ground is pretty much what Otavi consists of, but as usual the people there are ultra friendly, as are all the people, or rather the far majority of those, I have met in Namibia so far</i>

Welcome to the “metropolitan City of Otavi”, what you see in the back ground is pretty much what Otavi consists of, but as usual the people there are ultra friendly, as are all the people, or rather the far majority of those, I have met in Namibia so far

After leaving Otavi and 60 kilometres from Tsumeb, the countryside changed into what ‘Buddy and Me’ really enjoy, lots of hills, more dense bush and I actually had to turn the steering wheel at times to negotiate the bends in the road, and at one stage, about 20 kilometres from Tsumeb, I had to change gears, from 4th to 3rd and then even to 2nd to get up a hill, amazing! And so we entered Tsumeb.

<i>Welcome to Tsumeb</i>

Welcome to Tsumeb

Having arrived in this, what I regarded as the most beautiful and cleanest town I had had the pleasure of visiting on my ‘African Odyssey’ project, the first point of action was to find out where I would be spending the night. My intention was to spend two nights in Tsumeb, hopefully camping at the lovely municipal camping grounds I had been sponsored camping facilities at on my last visit to the town, but on arriving at the Beares store I was told by the manager, Leon, that the resort had been taken over by a private family/organisation and that on making enquiries about sponsoring two nights camping for ‘Buddy and Me’ they had been told that they – as in the case of Freddie at the Acacia Resort in Otjiewarongo – are not a charity organisation.

Fortunately as always happens, there are some wonderful people around and Louw Le Roux at the ‘Makalani Hotel’ offered the hotels facilities for our accommodation and so ‘Buddy and Me’ are comfortably settled in our lovely, luxurious accommodation at the ‘Makalani Hotel’. I did however pay a visit to the campsite, which is called the Kupfer quelle resort where they have a Dros franchise and where I indulged in a Tafel lager to quench my thirst after the hot and long drive from Otjiewarongo, and after making enquiries about the cost of camping established that the resort is, without a shadow of doubt, the most expensive camping/caravan park in Africa. The charge for one person camping is R175-00 per night; a couple camping costs a staggering R230-00 (almost 32 US Dollars) per night, and for every additional person there is an additional cost of R57-50 (+- 8 US Dollars). I mean, come on, all campers touring Africa want and need is a place to set up their tent or caravan and a clean ablution block, preferably one providing hot water, at the most reasonable price, so what more can a camping resort provide to warrant such a ridiculously high cost? Whatever it is, it’s not needed.

So, after an enjoyable day’s drive, and settled comfortably for the night in the lovely ‘Makalani Hotel’ I popped into the hotels bar to have a refreshing brandy and coke (Klippies nogal) and had a chat with the friendly staff and other guests of the hotel, wonderful people. Obviously the topic of child rape featured prominently and I was informed of three cases of child rape having occurred during the past three months.

The ‘Makalani Hotels’ contact details are; Telephone +264-67-221051, email: makalani@makalanihotel.com website: www.makalanihotel.com it’s definitely the place to stay in Tsumeb when you visit this lovely town.

<i>Meet Imms on the left and Eugene Havinga on the right. Imms was born in Namibia and has never left the countries borders and Eugene hails from Bellville in Cape Town and frequently visits his family there, well whenever he gets the opportunity that is, it’s pretty far from here</i>

Meet Imms on the left and Eugene Havinga on the right. Imms was born in Namibia and has never left the countries borders and Eugene hails from Bellville in Cape Town and frequently visits his family there, well whenever he gets the opportunity that is, it’s pretty far from here

<i>The view from my room window</i>

The view from my room window

So that’s another day gone in the life of ‘Buddy and Me’, hopefully I will meet up with an IT specialist here in Tsumeb tomorrow who can forward my blog/email to Gail so that she can up-date my website, So until next time, keep well, keep safe, and keep all children safe, come on guys listen to me!

Caring regards from
‘Buddy and Me’ (Steve Heath)
Comments and opinions can be sent to me via: steve@buddyandme.co.za

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